NEW BOOKS IN MARCH 12+

« Back

Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi, published by Macmillan

They killed my mother.

They took our magic.

They tried to bury us. 

NOW WE RISE. 

Zélie remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. When different clans ruled – Burners igniting flames, Tiders beckoning waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoning forth souls.

But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, anyone with powers was targeted and killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope. Only a few people remain with the power to use magic, and they must remain hidden.

Zélie is one such person. Now she has a chance to bring back magic to her people and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must learn to harness her powers and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good.

Danger lurks in Orïsha, where strange creatures prowl, and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to come to terms with the strength of her magic – and her growing feelings for an enemy.

Big Bones by Laura Dockrill, published by Bonnier

 The latest teen novel from the sparkling Laura Dockrill, introducing Bluebelle, and her moving, hilarious take on food, body image and how we look after ourselves and others

A heart-warming teen story from the unique voice of Laura Dockrill, about Bluebelle, aka BB, aka Big Bones – a sixteen-year-old girl encouraged to tackle her weight even though she’s perfectly happy, thank you, and getting on with her life and in love with food. Then a tragedy in the family forces BB to find a new relationship with her body and herself. Moving, memorable and hilarious.

Enter our competition to win one of 10 copies of Big Bones up for grabs.

Flying Tips for Flightless Birds by Kelly McCaughrain, published by Walker

From debut author Kelly McCaughrain comes a sweet and kooky romcom for fans of R. J. Palacio’s Wonder, Sarah Crossan, and Susin Nielsen’s We Are All Made of Molecules.

Twins Finch and Birdie Franconi are stars of the flying trapeze. But when Birdie suffers a terrifying accident, Finch must team up with the geeky new kid, Hector Hazzard, to form an all-boys double act and save the family circus school.

Together they learn to walk the high-wire of teen life and juggle the demands of friends, family, first love and facing up to who they are – all served up with a dash of circus-showbiz magic.

Read an extract from Flying Tips for Flightless Birds here.

To Kill A Kingdom by Alexandra Christo, published by Bonnier

 Dark and romantic YA fantasy for fans of Sarah J Maas – about the siren with a taste for royal blood and the prince who has sworn to destroy her.

Princess Lira is siren royalty and the most lethal of them all. With the hearts of seventeen princes in her collection, she is revered across the sea. Until a twist of fate forces her to kill one of her own. To punish her daughter, the Sea Queen transforms Lira into the one thing they loathe most – a human. Robbed of her song, Lira has until the winter solstice to deliver Prince Elian’s heart to the Sea Queen or remain a human forever.

The ocean is the only place Prince Elian calls home, even though he is heir to the most powerful kingdom in the world. Hunting sirens is more than an unsavoury hobby – it’s his calling. When he rescues a drowning woman in the ocean, she’s more than what she appears. She promises to help him find the key to destroying all of sirenkind for good. But can he trust her? And just how many deals will Elian have to barter to eliminate mankind’s greatest enemy?

Bonnier have 20 proof copies of To Kill a Kingdom to give away. Enter our competition here.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, published by Penguin

When two rich young gentlemen move to town, they don’t go unnoticed – especially when Mrs Bennett vows to have one of her five daughters marry into their fortunes. But love, as Jane and Elizabeth Bennett soon discover, is rarely straightforward, and often surprising. It’s only a matter of time until their own small worlds are turned upside down and they discover that first impressions can be the most misleading of all.

With a behind-the-scenes journey, including an author profile, a guide to who’s who, activities and more.

What’s Weird On Earth, published by DK

Fact-hungry kids will love poring over these warped world maps full of unique and weird data. See how many lightning strikes hit parts of our planet, the wind patterns of the whole world, and even how the world map would look if global warming melted the ice caps!

Covering everything from Pangea to the world’s weirdest natural wonders, this is Earth in all its strange glory. What’s Weird on Earth is an entirely new atlas adventure, with maps of UFO sightings, popular foods, every country resized according to population density, and their popularity as holiday destinations. Kids can spot the strangest features on every corner of Earth; from ancient patterns carved in the desert sand to the 29,000 bath toys that sailed the world’s ocean currents after a shipwreck.

Travel back in time to discover maps from previous centuries or turn the globe upside down – literally. Planet Earth will never seem the same again!

The Exact Opposite of Okay by Laura Stevens, published by Egmont 16+

A hilarious, groundbreaking young adult novel for anyone who’s ever called themselves a feminist…and anyone who hasn’t. For fans of Louise O’Neill, Holly Bourne and Amy Schumer.

Izzy O’Neill here! Impoverished orphan, aspiring comedian and Slut Extraordinaire, if the gossip sites are anything to go by…

Izzy never expected to be eighteen and internationally reviled. But when explicit photos involving her, a politician’s son and a garden bench are published online, the trolls set out to take her apart. Armed with best friend Ajita and a metric ton of nachos, she tries to laugh it off – but as the daily slut-shaming intensifies, she soon learns the way the world treats teenage girls is not okay. It’s the Exact Opposite of Okay.

Bitingly funny and shockingly relevant, The Exact Opposite of Okay is a bold, brave and necessary read. For readers of The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas and Doing It by Hannah Witton.
Warning: Contains adult themes

The Serpent’s Shadow: The Graphic Novel by Rick Riordan, published by Penguin

CARTER AND SADIE KANE, descendants of the magical House of Life, are in pretty big trouble.

Despite their bravest efforts, Apophis, the giant snake of Chaos, is still threatening to plunge the world into eternal darkness. Now the Kanes must do something no magician has ever managed – defeat Apophis himself. No pressure there then. Battling against the forces of Chaos, their only hope is an ancient spell – but the magic has been lost for a millennia. Will they find the serpent’s shadow, or will they be led to their deaths in the depths of the Underworld?

Be The Change by Eunic Moyle and Sabrina Moyle, published by Quarto

Be the Change! gives you the tools and encouragement needed to be the change you wish to see in the world. From the popular founders of Hello!Lucky stationery, this guidebook offers instruction and guidance to spark creativity and inspire action in your local communities.

Eunice Moyle and Sabrina Moyle, are co-authors of Happy Mail and Be the Change, and form the sister entrepreneur team who started Hello!Lucky, a San Francisco-based design studio founded in 2003.

Win a copy of Be the Change in Quarto’s book bundle competition.

Truly, Wildly, Deeply by Jenny McLachlan, published by Bloomsbury

Annie is starting college. She can’t wait. No more school, no more uniform, and no one telling her what to do. It’s the start of a new adventure and Annie’s not going to let anyone or anything get in the way of that. Freedom matters to Annie. She has cerebral palsy and she’s had to fight hard to get the world to see her for who she truly is.

Then she meets Fab. He’s six foot two, Polish and a passionate believer in…well, just about everything, but most of all Annie and good old fashioned romance. The moment Fab sees Annie, he’s wildly drawn to her and declares she must be his girl. Annie’s horrified. She doesn’t want to be anyone’s anything, especially if it means losing her independence.

But then Annie finds herself falling for Fab. As things go deeply wrong, Annie realises that love can make you do wild, crazy things, and so she sets out to win his heart with a romantic gesture of truly epic proportions!

Tender by Eve Ainsworth, published by Scholastic

Marty and Daisy spend their lives pretending. Marty pretends his mum’s grip on reality isn’t slipping by the day. Daisy pretends her parents aren’t exhausting themselves while they look after her incurably ill brother. They both pretend they’re fine. But the thing about pretending is, at some point, it has to stop. And then what?

Touching on mental health, family, friendship and the pressures that teenage carers face, as author Cat Clarke says, Tender is “a compassionate, compelling and unflinching novel”. Great for fans of fans of Patrice Lawrence and Emery Lord.

Win a copy of Tender in our competition here.

The Truth About Alice by Jennifer Mathieu, published by Hachette

Everyone knows Alice slept with two guys at one party.

But did you know Alice was sexting Brandon when he crashed his car?

It’s true. Ask ANYBODY.

Rumour has it that Alice Franklin is a slut. It’s written all over the ‘slut stall’ in the girls’ bathroom at Healy High for everyone to see. And after star quarterback Brandon Fitzsimmons dies in a car accident, the rumours start to spiral out of control.

In this remarkable novel, four Healy High students – the party girl, the car accident survivor, the ex best friend and the boy next door – tell all they know. But exactly what is the truth about Alice? In the end there’s only one person to ask: Alice herself.

Optimists Die First by Susin Nielsen, published by Andersen

 ‘Hilarious, heart-warming and beautifully unexpected – a real keeper’ LISA WILLIAMSON

Ever since tragedy struck her family, Petula has learnt to see danger everywhere. She’s determined not to let her guard down. Then she meets Jacob, Strikingly tall and confident, he’s survived different kind of disaster and still come out smiling. At first Petula is repelled by his outgoing optimism, yet even she can’t deny their chemistry together. But optimism – and love – are blind. And Petula is heading full speed into the danger zone.

#WorldBookDay