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NEW BOOKS IN FEBRUARY 2019 (12+)

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[ New books in February for 0-5, 5-8, 8-12]

On The Come Up, by Angie Thomas, published by Walker Books

The award-winning author of The Hate U Give returns with a powerful story about hip hop, freedom of speech and fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you.

Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri’s got massive shoes to fill. But when her first song goes viral for all the wrong reasons, Bri finds herself at the centre of controversy and portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. And with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri no longer just wants to make it – she has to. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be.
* As in The Hate U Give, On The Come Up will have mentions of some mature content e.g. drug use.

Heartstopper: Volume One, by Alice Oseman, published by Hachette Children’s Group

Boy meets boy. Boys become friends. Boys fall in love. Charlie and Nick are at the same school, but they’ve never met … until one day when they’re made to sit together. They quickly become friends, and soon Charlie is falling hard for Nick, even though he doesn’t think he has a chance.

But love works in surprising ways, and Nick is more interested in Charlie than either of them realised.

 

Enchantée by Gita Trelease, published by Macmillan Children’s Books

A compellingly beautiful tale of magic, intrigue and deception, set against the backdrop of eighteenth-century Paris on the cusp of revolution. Paris in 1789 is a labyrinth of twisted streets, filled with beggars, thieves, revolutionaries – and magicians . . .

When seventeen-year-old Camille is left orphaned, she has to provide for her frail sister and her volatile brother. In desperation, she survives by using the petty magic she learnt from her mother. But when her brother disappears Camille decides to pursue a richer, more dangerous mark: the glittering court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. Using dark magic Camille transforms herself into the ‘Baroness de la Fontaine‘ and presents herself at the court of Versaille, where she soon finds herself swept up in a dizzying life of riches, finery and suitors. But Camille’s resentment of the rich is at odds with the allure of their glamour and excess, and she soon discovers that she’s not the only one leading a double life . . .

Enchantée is a compelling historical fantasy and is Gita Trelease’s debut novel.

The Stolen Ones, by Vanessa Curtis, published by Usborne 

My name is Inge. I am 16. I live in Munich. Food is rationed, though the war ended years ago. My boyfriend is Jewish. My parents would not approve, so I hide this from them. I think they are hiding something from me, too. Letters arrive on my birthday, but they are not addressed to me. They are for a girl named Kasia. This is her story.

Enter the competition to win a copy
Read an exclusive extract here

 
Jack of Hearts (And Other Parts), by L.C. Rosen, published by Penguin

Jack Rothman is seventeen. A solid student with a talent for art, he likes partying, makeup and boys. Sometimes all at the same time. His active, unashamed sex life makes him a red hot topic for the high school gossip machine, but Jack doesn’t really care too much about what the crowd is saying about him. His mantra is: ‘It could be worse.’ And then it is.

When Jack starts writing a teen sex advice column for his best friend’s website, he begins to receive creepy and threatening love letters. His ‘admirer’ is obsessed with Jack – they know who he’s hanging out with, who he’s sleeping with, who his mum is dating. And while they say they love Jack, they don’t love his lifestyle. They want him to curb his sexuality and personality. And if he won’t, they will force him. As his stalker starts to ratchet up the pressure, it’s up to Jack and his friends to uncover their identity, before their love becomes genuinely dangerous.

Watch Us Rise, by Renee Watson and Ellen Hagan, published by Bloomsbury

A stirring and unputdownable read about what it means to be a woman today. Perfect for fans of Moxie and The Hate U Give.

Jasmine and Chelsea are best friends on a mission. Sick of the way that young women are treated even at their ‘progressive’ New York City high school, they decide to start a Women’s Rights Club. One problem – no one shows up. That hardly stops them. They start posting everything from videos of Chelsea performing her poetry to Jasmine’s response to being reduced to a racist and sexist stereotype in the school’s theatre department. And soon, they’ve gone viral, creating a platform they never could’ve predicted.

With such positive support, the Women’s Rights Club is also targeted by trolls. But Jasmine and Chelsea won’t let their voices – or those of the other young women in their city – be silenced. They’ll risk everything to be heard and effect change … but at what cost?

The Burning, by Laura Bates, published by Simon & Schuster

The Burning tells the story of fifteen-year-old Anna who has moved to a small Scottish village with her mother. There’s nothing to trace Anna back to her old life. Nothing to link her to the ‘incident’. At least that’s what she thinks… until the whispers start up again.

Desperate for a distraction to escape the brutal bullying at school, Anna loses herself in a history project about a young girl, Maggie, who was accused of witchcraft hundreds of years before. The parallels between the persecution of medieval witches and the social burning of modern day Anna become unnervingly apparent. The reader will be left in no doubt: it’s time to extinguish society’s sexist attitudes.

Check out Laura’s YA Book Club for February!

Shadowscent: The Darkest Bloom, by P.M. Freestone, published by Scholastic

A lush, beguiling YA fantasy world with a central romance that simmers to a boil In the empire of Aramtesh, scent has power. When disaster strikes and the prince lies poisoned, long-suppressed rivalries threaten to blow the empire apart. It’s up to 17-year-old Rakel, a poor village girl with a talent for fragrances, and Ash, the prince’s loyal bodyguard, to work out an antidote and restore order. The unlikely pair race across the empire in a desperate bid to unlock ancient, cryptic instructions – and confront buried truths from their own pasts along the way. It’s an adventure that will ignite your senses!

 

Monsters, by Sharon Dogar, published by Andersen Press

 1814: Two 16–year-old stepsisters run away with a married man. The results are devastating and the ripples will be felt for centuries.

This is the incredible story of Mary Shelley – radical, rebellious and entranced. It is the story of a young woman who defies tradition and society, and who draws upon the monstrous elements of her own life to create the most memorable monster of them all.

Celebrating 200 years since the publication of Frankenstein, acclaimed writer Sharon Dogar brings to life the passion, tragedy and forbidden love of its teenage author.

The New Children’s Encyclopedia, published by DK 

When? Where? What? Why? This stimulating and comprehensive encyclopedia for children provides answers to all the questions kids love to ask.

Each chapter is jam-packed with maps, charts, timelines, diagrams, beautiful images and amazing facts. Did you know, for example, that a single drop of blood contains around five million blood cells? Or that there are areas of desert in all seven of Earth’s continents?

Prepare to build your knowledge on a wide range of topics – including Earth and beyond, plants and animals, history and politics, science, technology, and the human body – arranged thematically with more than 9,000 indexed entries and 2,500 colourful images. This is the must-have reference book for every child’s library.

#WorldBookDay