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Happy Mother’s Day! Celebrate mums with these brilliant books

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For Mother’s Day on the 31st of March, we’ve pulled together a list of  books with brilliant maternal figures. From superhero mums to caring grandmothers, we’re celebrating every kind of wonderful mum!

0-5

Superhero Mum and Son and Superhero Mum and Daughter,by Timothy Knapman, illustrated by Joe Berger, published by Nosy Crow 

All mums are brilliant and this mum is no exception. She doesn’t wear a cape or fly to earth from outer space, but she runs for the bus so fast it feels like flying, uses her super strength to carry boots, coat, bag AND a scooter, and can make bumps and bruises better with just a kiss. This mum really does have superpowers!

Download the Superhero Mum card here

Little Tigers, by Jo Weaver, published by Hachette Children’s Group

Mother Tiger and her two cubs journey through their jungle habitat, searching high and low for the perfect new home where they will be safe. A beautifully illustrated celebration of the love between parent and child and the wonders of the natural world. With its mesmerising, atmospheric charcoal drawings and lyrical storytelling, Jo Weaver’s new picture book has the feel of an instant classic. Perfect for fans of BBC’s Planet Earth.

Mummy Time, by Judith Kerr, published by HarperCollins

Mummy time is magic time in this unexpected and enchanting new tale from the one and only Judith Kerr, creator of The Tiger Who Came to Tea and Mog the Forgetful Cat.

 From Judith Kerr OBE comes a future classic to touch the heart and tickle the funny bone. With whip-smart observation, illustration perfection and the unexpected twist on the everyday that personifies Judith’s classics, Mummy Time is sure to join the ranks of her very best, and bestselling, books. Full of warmth, whimsy and wit – and the very special magic that can only happen when you’re with Mummy…

Download an extract here

Clap Hands: Here Come the Mummies and Babies, by Pat-a-Cake, published by Hachette Children’s Group

Here Come the Mummies and Babies is a playful touch-and-feel book, full of energy, fun and of course, lots of cute mummy and baby animals! Toddlers will laugh, shout, clap their hands and join in the fun as the simple text encourages them to point, count, match and talk about the friendly, fluffy pals playing on every page. With textures to feel on every page and a matching game page at the end, everyone will want to clap hands for the mummies and babies!

Spot Loves him Mom, by Eric Hill, published by PRH

Spot loves spending time with his mum. They do lots of fun things together. Sometimes, he helps her with the groceries and sometimes they play hide-and-seek in the garden. Join the much-loved Spot on his day with his mum as he learns what it means to spend time with his mum – great for early learning and play. Spot loves Mum and Mum loves Spot!  

Goodnight Baby Moon, published by DK

A wonderfully charming bedtime story to share with children 2 and up. The perfect introduction to our moon for young children, featuring a beautiful light-up LED moon on the book jacket.

Learn about the different phases of the moon in Goodnight Baby Moon as you follow a family of little rabbits taking a night-time stroll through the woods. With easy-to-follow text, simple repeated phrases and beautiful spread designs, young children will be fully engaged by this delightful story that is perfect for reading aloud. See the crescent moon change to a full moon and discover tiny surprises along the way, such as friendly owls in trees and fluttering butterflies.

Charming and unique, Goodnight Baby Moon will appeal to the imagination of any pre-schooler eager to learn about the natural world around them.

I Want My Mum!, by Tony Ross, published by Andersen Press

When things go wrong for the Little Princess, there’s one person who can always make it better, and the castle rings with the constant shout of ‘I Want My Mum!’ But how will the Queen feel when the Little Princess learns to cope on her own?

 

For All The Stars Across The Sky, by Karl Newson, and illustrated by Chiaki Okada, published by Walker Books

For all the stars across the sky, big and little and bright. Here’s a wish from me to you, before we say goodnight

Every evening, when the sun is fading, Luna and her mother play a game. They close their eyes, make a wish, and imagine themselves on the most incredible of adventures – swimming with the sound of whale song, flying like birds, and gazing over the tallest treetops… Glowing with lyricism, intimacy and love, this beautiful bedtime story celebrates the bond between parent and child, and is brought majestically to life by illustrator Chiaki Okada.

Grandma Bird, by Benji Davies, published by Simon & Schuster

Noi isn’t at all sure about spending the summer at Grandma’s house. Grandma boils seaweed for soup, and there’s not much to do on the tiny island where she lives where the wind cuts in and the grass grows sideways. But that’s before Noi gets swept up in a dramatic rescue that will mark the beginning of a touching new friendship.

How Big Is Our Baby? by Smriti Prasadam-Halls, published by Hachette Children’s Group

When a new baby is on the way, siblings-to-be have lots of feelings and plenty of questions. But whether they’re impatient, curious or a little worried, this friendly and reassuring guide explains each step of the pregnancy journey and helps little ones feel involved and excited. With a month-by-month approach that compares the size of the growing baby to something familiar to the young reader, such as a speck of sand at the seaside or an egg, readers also find out about how Baby is developing, from when the heart might first beat to when they’ll be able to feel it kick. The book also includes information about how life might change once Baby arrives, and how exciting it will be to have a new baby brother or sister.

5-8

My Grandma & Me, by Mina Javaherbin, published by Lindsey Yankey, published by Walker Books 

In this big universe full of many moons, I have travelled and seen many wonders, but I have never loved anything or anyone the way I love my grandma.

While Mina is growing up in Iran, the centre of her world is her grandmother. Whether visiting friends next door, going to the mosque for midnight prayers during Ramadan, or taking an imaginary trip around the planets, Mina and her grandma are never far apart… At once deeply personal and utterly universal, this story is a love letter of the rarest sort: the kind that shares a bit of its warmth with every reader.

Mummy Fairy and Me: Unicorn Wishes, by Sophie Kinsella, illustrated by Marta Kissi, published by PRH

My mummy looks normal, like any other mummy . . . but she’s not. Because she can turn into a fairy. All she has to do is stamp her feet three times, clap her hands, wiggle her bottom and say ‘Marshmallow’ . . . and POOF! She’s Mummy Fairy. 

Ella’s family has a big secret – her mummy is a fairy! But sometimes Mummy Fairy’s magic goes wrong, and it’s up to Ella to help… In this third book of adventures about Mummy Fairy and Ella, you’ll find flying cars, enchanted ballet shoes, a unicorn in the kitchen, and Ella’s very own magical wardrobe.

Amazing Grace, by Mary Hoffman, illustrated by Caroline Binch, published by Frances Lincoln

Grace loves to act out stories. Sometimes she plays the leading part, sometimes she is ‘a cast of thousands.’ When her school decides to perform Peter Pan , Grace is longing to play Peter, but her classmates say that Peter was a boy, and besides, he wasn’t black… But Grace’s Ma and Nana tell her she can be anything she wants if she puts her mind to it…

 

8-12

Little Women: The Sisterhood, by Louisa May Alcott, published by PRH              

Meg is the eldest and on the brink of love. Then there’s tomboy Jo who longs to be a writer. Sweet-natured Beth always puts others first, and finally there’s Amy, the youngest and most precocious. Together they are the March sisters. Even though money is short, times are tough and their father is away at war, their infectious sense of fun sweeps everyone up in their adventures – including Laurie, the boy next door. And through sisterly squabbles, their happy times and sad ones too, the sisters discover that growing up is sometimes very hard to do.

Little Women is one of six unforgettable Puffin Classics, brought together for International Women’s Day in a stunning set in celebration of some of the most iconic female writers of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

The Witches, by Roald Dahl, illustrated by Quentin Blake, published by Puffin

Real witches dress in ordinary clothes and look like ordinary women. But they are not ordinary. They are always plotting and scheming with murderous, bloodthirsty thoughts – and they hate children. The Grand High Witch hates children most of all and plans to make every single one of YOU disappear. Only one boy and his grandmother can stop her, but if their plan fails the Grand High Witch will frizzle them like fritters, and then what . . . ?

The Railway Children, by E. Nesbit, published by Penguin

When Father is taken away unexpectedly, Roberta, Peter, Phyllis and their mother have to leave their comfortable life in London to go and live in a small cottage in the country. The children seek solace in the nearby railway station, and make friends with Perks the Porter and the Station Master himself. Each day, the children run down the field to the railway track and wave at the passing London train, sending their love to Father. Little do they know that the kindly old gentleman passenger who waves back holds the key to their father’s disappearance. . 

Anne of Green Gables, by L.M. Montgomery, illustrated by Elena Distefano, published by Sweet Cherry

Her name isn’t Cordelia, her hair isn’t black, and she has no parents. These are the tragical facts of Anne Shirley’s life until she comes to Green Gables and faces another: she’s a girl. Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert wanted a boy to help with the farm work but of all the things Anne can imagine, leaving Green Gables isn’t one of them. She’ll do anything to stay – talk less, pay more attention, control her temper. At least she’ll try to.

 My Mum Tracy Beaker, by Jacqueline Wilson, illustrated by Nick Sharratt, published by Penguin

Jess and Tracy Beaker are the perfect team. They do everything together. Jess thinks Tracy is the best mum ever, even when she shouts at her teachers! Tracy has made the perfect home for Jess, leaving The Dumping Ground far behind her. Yes, their flat’s a bit mouldy. It’s only just big enough for two. And the Duke Estate is a bit scary. But it’s their happy home. 

Until Sean Godfrey, Tracy’s rich boyfriend, whisks them away to his mansion, life of fast cars and celebrity stardom. Will Jess’s brilliant mum turn into a new person altogether? And will Tracy realise that her childhood dream might not be what she needs after all? 

12+

On The Come Up, by Angie Thomas, published by Walker Books

The award-winning author of The Hate U Give returns with a powerful story about hip hop, freedom of speech and fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you.

Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri’s got massive shoes to fill. But when her first song goes viral for all the wrong reasons, Bri finds herself at the centre of controversy and portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. And with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri no longer just wants to make it – she has to. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be.

The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green, published by Penguin

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning author John Green’s most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love.

If I Stay, by Gayle Forman, published by Random House

Everybody has to make choices. Some might break you. For seventeen-year-old Mia, surrounded by a wonderful family, friends and a gorgeous boyfriend decisions might seem tough, but they’re all about a future full of music and love, a future that’s brimming with hope. But life can change in an instant. A cold February morning . . . a snowy road . . . and suddenly all of Mia’s choices are gone. Except one. As alone as she’ll ever be, Mia must make the most difficult choice of all.

Between Shades of Gray, by Ruta Sepetys, published by Penguin

Between Shades of Gray is a haunting and powerful Second World War novel by Ruta Sepetys That morning, my brother’s life was worth a pocket watch …One night fifteen-year-old Lina, her mother and young brother are hauled from their home by Soviet guards, thrown into cattle cars and sent away. They are being deported to Siberia. An unimaginable and harrowing journey has begun. Lina doesn’t know if she’ll ever see her father or her friends again. But she refuses to give up hope. Lina hopes for her family. For her country. For her future. For love – first love, with the boy she barely knows but knows she does not want to lose …Will hope keep Lina alive? 

#WorldBookDay