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NEW BOOKS IN APRIL 2019 (0-5)

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[New books in April for 5-8, 8-12, 12+]

The Woods, by Rob Hodgson, published by Frances Lincoln Children’s Books

Here are the woods. The woods are home to three foxes on a hunt for rabbits. Three foxes that don’t realise someone might be following them…From the author of The Cave, this is a fantastically funny cat-and-mouse (or fox-and-rabbit) story with a not-so-fluffy twist.

The foxes follow some helpful signs over the tallest trees, under the carrot fields and through the pumpkin patch, but there’s no sign of any rabbits. What on earth has happened to them? And why are there strange eyes following them from the trees?  

Children will love outwitting the foxes – who continually say, ‘No rabbits here’ – by spotting the rabbits in each colourful illustration.

Don’t Make Me Cross by Smriti Prasadam-Halls, illustrated by Angie Rozelaar, published by Bloomsbury

I’m a little monster, I am smiley, small and sweet,
With gorgeous little monster eyes and furry monster feet.
There’s just one thing that you should know …
I have to be the boss. And if you don’t remember …
I’ll get very VERY CROSS!

It’s Little Monster’s birthday and his friends are coming to his party. But it’s not much fun playing party games with someone who always has to win … or having birthday tea with someone who wants ALL the food for himself. It’s time this grumpy, grouchy Monster learned how to behave!

With funny rhyming text and delightful illustrations, this is the perfect picture book for little monsters everywhere.

Super Sloth, written and illustrated by Robert Starling, published by Andersen Press

Super Sloth isn’t fast. He can’t fly. But he is very, very good at moving slowly and looking just like a greenish bit of tree.  When his arch enemy Anteater makes off with some prize mangoes, Super Sloth vows to save the day… eventually.

From the creator of Waterstones Prize shortlisted Fergal is Fuming comes Starling’s laugh-out-loud tale of one ordinary sloth turned super hero.

Creature Features: Dinosaurs, by Natasha Durley, published by Big Picture Press

Vibrantly illustrated by Creature Features creator Natasha Durley, this is a dinosaur book with a difference. Each page is bursting with unusual creatures from the time of the dinosaurs, all united by a common characteristic. From long necks to terrific teeth, and from tyrannosaurs to ancient turtles, this eclectic collection of species celebrates the diversity of the dinosaurs and the animals they lived alongside. And with something to look for on every page, it’s guaranteed to inspire and fascinate young dinosaur lovers.

RHS How Does A Butterfly Grow?, published by DK

Learn more about butterflies and their life cycle in this illustrated picture book, produced in association with the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS).

With seven flaps to lift, this exciting nature book will entertain and educate pre-schoolers. They’ll love finding out about colourful butterflies and the butterfly life cycle, as they follow the pictures, lift the flaps, and read along with the friendly text.

A perfect first introduction to butterflies, young children will also discover fascinating butterfly facts, how they differ (and are similar) to moths, and how they need places where there are lots of flowers for them to feed on. A fun and informative picture book to share and enjoy!

Little Cloud, by Anne Booth, illustrated by Sarah Massini, published by Egmont

Once there was a dream of a cloud, waiting, hiding, in a blue sky, which became a whisper of white and grew and grew . . .

Everybody loves looking at the little white cloud as it makes all sorts of interesting shapes, but one day the little cloud becomes bigger and darker and heavier. As the raindrops patter down, everyone runs away and no one is happy to see the little cloud anymore . . .

Or are they?

This heartfelt, uplifting story has a powerful message about being loved and accepted for who you are, no matter what.

The Girl, the Bear and the Magic Shoes, by Julia Donaldson and Lydia Monks, published by Macmillan Children’s Books

A glittering magical adventure about a girl, a bear and some very special shoes from the bestselling creators of What the Ladybird Heard and Sugarlump and the Unicorn.

When Josephine leaves the shoe shop after buying some new running shoes, she hears an unusual sound – Click-click! Click-click! It’s a bear with a backpack! Luckily for Josephine, her new shoes are anything but ordinary – these are magic shoes. But can they help her escape the bear when there’s a mountain, a bog and even a lake in her way?

The Girl, the Bear and the Magic Shoes is an exciting adventure from the stellar picture-book partnership of Julia Donaldson and Lydia Monks, creators of What the Ladybird Heard. Full of action and imagination, and with a delightfully unexpected ending, this gorgeously glittery book is one to enjoy over and over again.

Enjoy all the stories from Julia Donaldson and Lydia Monks: Sharing a Shell, The Princess and the Wizard, The Rhyming Rabbit, The Singing Mermaid, Sugarlump and the Unicorn, Princess Mirror-Belle and the Dragon Pox, What the Ladybird Heard, What the Ladybird Heard Next and What the Ladybird Heard on Holiday.

B is for Baby by Atinuke, and illustrated by Angela Brooksbank published by Walker Books

Baby’s brother is getting ready to take a basket of bananas all the way to Baba’s bungalow in the next village. He will have to go along the bumpy road, past the baobab trees, birds and butterflies, and all the way over the bridge. What he doesn’t realize is that his cute, very curious baby sister is secretly coming along for the amazing bicycle ride, too! 

From the creators of Baby Goes to Market comes a beautiful, bright first book of words, perfect for pre-schoolers learning their ABC! Children will love sounding out the words in this playful, adventurous and vibrantly-illustrated story set in West Africa.

How to Light your Dragon, by Didier Lévy, illustrated by Fred Benaglia, published by Thames & Hudson

A little boy has a problem with his dragon: he’s no longer able to breathe fire. What to do? How on earth do you rekindle a despondent dragon’s flame? The little boy tries shaking him by his tail, and jumping on his belly, and tickling his legs… No joy. How about goading him somehow? – make him angry, fuel his jealousy… Still no luck. Maybe sticking false flames on the side of his face would work – but, no, that makes it all worse. Much, much worse. Oh no! He decides that he’ll just have to tell him that he loves him just the way he is, even though he can’t breathe fire, and that he will always be his dragon – and plants a big fat kiss on his cheek. What do you think happens next?

Rocketmole, by Matt Carr, illustrated by Matt Carr, published by Scholastic

Armstrong the mole is fed up with living underground. His friends think building a rocket to visit the moon is an astronomically bad idea, but Armstrong is a mole on a mission. On the moon, Armstrong bounces around in his space suit, but soon starts to miss his cautious mole mates. How can a mole with big dreams combine adventure and friendship? A brave and bold new picture book by Matt Carr, perfectly timed for the 50th moon landing anniversary.

Matisse’s Magical Trail, by Tim Hopgood, illustrated by Sam Boughton, published by Oxford University Press

Matisse is a young snail who loves to create beautiful drawings with his trail. The trouble is most of the time people are far too busy to even notice them. It’s only when a child notices Matisse’s beautiful trails that his art is finally celebrated – and they inspire a whole class of children to get creative too!

 

Daddy Fartypants, by Emer Stamp, published by Hachette Children’s Group

Daddy Fartypants was a very windy bear. It didn’t matter where he was. Or what he was doing…

Of all the reasons to be embarrassed by your dad, loud and persistent FARTING is the WORST. The trouble with Daddy Fartypants is that he won’t even say sorry for his bottom blasts; he always blames someone else. But that all changes when Daddy meets his son’s lovely (and very windy!) new teacher…

#WorldBookDay